Kale Smoothies

All season our Farmers’ Market customers have been talking about kale smoothies. They’re all in love with them. So, on their recommendation, we started making our own simple version and boy they’re right! Kale smoothies are fantastic! Definitely among the easiest and tastiest way to eat a lot of wonderfully nutrient dense kale. Now we have kale for breakfast.We share them as a family and our three year old son loves them. He can’t get enough.

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Kale: The Bones

Here are a couple pictures of kale I share mostly because I enjoy pictures of kale but also because kale, in a lot of ways, is the foundation of our farm.The best advice I can give folks wanting to farm on tiny plots, in close quarters, is to grow kale. Looking at it in a “yield [...]

Summer Kale Part 3 and Citrus Kale Salad

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Three months ago I decided to do a short series of posts about summer kale. The thought was that while people are becoming okay with kale in the winter, it still gets overlooked in the summer. That’s a shame. Kale is one of very few veggies that can be grown all year long. It’s always in season. My plan was to argue the case for summertime kale. This is the third and final post in that series.

We grow three varieties of kale on our tiny farm; Curly, Red Russian and Lacinato. In many ways, they’re all quite similar, sharing a basic, earthy kale-ishness. At the same time, they’re unique and distinct enough to more than justify our offering all three varieties. Here’s a quick rundown of how they differ and how we use them: Continue reading Summer Kale Part 3 and Citrus Kale Salad

Kale Chips

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If I’d posted about kale chips two years ago I’d have been very cool; a tattooed, Chuck Taylor wearing, longboarding to the vegan deli, kind of cool. A year ago, I’d still have been sort of cool, like seeing Dennis Kucinich on a city bus. Now? Now I’m just a sad forty-year-old, bald, pot-bellied doffer, hanging around the pedestrian mall in Bermudas. Trying to look young. Trying to look fresh. It’s painful just thinking about it.

That being said, almost everyone I know is making kale chips these days and it sounds like they’re all using a different recipe. They share their recipes with me at market. Some call for vinegar. Others have garlic. Some are made in a dehydrator instead of an oven. One lady I met sundrys hers. They’re all different and they all sound great. So many people experimenting with so food is very cool. On the other side, my day job is at a large natural foods store. We just added our third retail brand of kale chips. Each brand has a half-dozen or so flavors. There are almost 20 options in kale chips on our shelves. 20 choices at the grocery? There’s nothing cool about that.

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Defending Kale - Sesame Kale

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Sixteen years ago, after more than a decade working in restaurants, I punched out from my last kitchen shift and took a job running the deli in a natural foods grocery store. The place was adorable. Our produce was 90% organic. (It was also 90% ugly and bruised but that’s what you got with organic back then.) We sold nuts and grains from huge, bulk scoop bins. We sold herbal cures and tinctures. All our meat was 100% hormone, steroid and anti-biotic free. And my deli? We served some good food (house made gravelax and pate spring to mind), but ultimately we were as crunchy as could be. We served hippies and the hippies loved us. They wrote songs about us! They named their bands after us! Really, they did. It was incredible.

The store and my deli should have been a haven for all things kale. But it wasn’t. We ordered exactly one case per week and we used it exclusively to garnish platters in the deli case. We never cooked it. We never served it. We never ate it and nobody ever asked us to. I don’t think I even realized it was edible.

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Early Spring Transplanting and Portuguese Kale Soup

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Early spring  at the farmer’s market will be a tricky business. The things we will have for sale, when the weekly market starts in about a month, will likely not be the things people will be looking to buy. They certainly won’t be the things I would want to buy. Early May, with the days getting longer and the temperatures getting hotter, it’s easy to forget the season. Who wants yet more brazing greens or root veggies with summer on the horizon and everything in bloom? I know I”ll be craving soft greens, tomatoes, peppers and corn. Unfortunately, we’ll arrive at market offering kale (three kinds), chard, spinach, bunch onion, some head lettuce and a whole lot of not yet edible plants for peoples home gardens. It’s hard work to keep our early spring farmer’s markets from being a letdown to our customers. But there’s not much we can do. We are servile to nature. We are slaves to the season. There’s no getting around that.

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